Loading...
How Kidney Stones Are Removed - Healthy Life Style
How Kidney Stones Are Removed
General,  Health

How Kidney Stones Are Removed

Like we all know kidney stones are removed, the kidneys are a pair of bean-shaped organs on each side of the spinal cord, below the ribs and behind the abdomen. Each kidney is between 4 and 5 inches long, about the size of a large fist.

The job of the kidneys is to filter your blood. Eliminate waste, control the water balance of the body and maintain good levels of electrolytes. All the blood in your body goes through them several times a day. Make sure you read the rest of the article here

How Kidney Stones Are Removed

Large stones and those that cause symptoms.

Kidney stones that can not be treated with conservative measures, either because they are too big to pass on alone, or because they cause bleeding, kidney damage, or ongoing urinary tract infections, may require further treatment. Procedures may include:

Use sound waves to break stones.

For some kidney stones (depending on size and location), your doctor may recommend a procedure called extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy.

ESWL uses sound waves to create strong vibrations (shock waves) that break down the stones into small pieces that can pass through the urine. The procedure takes about 45 to 60 minutes and can cause moderate pain. You may be sedated or under light anesthesia to feel comfortable.

The ECL can cause blood in the urine, bruising the back or abdomen, bleeding around the kidneys and other adjacent organs, and discomfort when fragments of stones pass through the urinary tract.

Surgery to remove very large kidney stones.

A procedure called percutaneous nephrolithotomy which involves surgically removal of the kidney stone using small telescopes and instruments inserted through a small incision in the back.

You will receive a general anesthesia during the operation and will stay in the hospital for one or two days while you recover. Your doctor may recommend this surgery if the CEA has not been successful.

Use a telescope to remove the stones.

Kidney stones are removed from your ureter or kidneys, your doctor may pass a thin light tube (ureteroscope) with a camera using your urethra and bladder.

Once the stone is found, special tools can trap it or break it into pieces that will pass through the urine. Then your doctor can place a small tube (stent) in the ureter to relieve swelling and promote healing. General or local anesthesia may be required during this procedure.

Surgery of the parathyroid gland.

Some calcium phosphate stones are caused by hyperactivity of the parathyroid glands, which are found at the four corners of the thyroid, just below the Adam’s apple. When these glands produce too much parathyroid hormone (hyperparathyroidism), their calcium levels may become too high and, as a result, kidney stones may form.

Hyperparathyroidism, most of the time occurs when a small tumor forms in one of the parathyroid glands or when you develop another condition that results in the production of more parathyroid hormone by these glands. Elimination of growth of the gland stops the formation of kidney stones or your doctor may recommend a treatment for the condition that causes over-production of the parathyroid hormone.

How does it form:

Kidney stones (kidney stones, nephrolithiasis) are hard deposits formed by minerals and salts that form in the kidneys.

Kidney stones have numerous causes and can affect any part of your urinary tract, from the kidneys to the bladder. Often, stones are formed when the urine is concentrated, allowing the minerals to crystallize and stick.

Passing kidney stones can be very painful when trying to be removed, but the stones usually do not cause permanent damage if they are recognized in time. Depending on your situation, you may not need anything other than taking painkillers and drinking plenty of water to pass a kidney stone. In other cases, for example, if stones lodge in the urinary tract, are associated with urinary tract infection or cause complications, surgery may be required.

Your doctor may recommend preventive treatment to reduce the risk of recurrent kidney stones if you have a higher risk of developing them again.

Kidney stones (kidney stones, nephrolithiasis) are hard deposits formed by minerals and salts that form in the kidneys.

Kidney stones have many causes and can affect any part of your urinary tract, from the kidneys to the bladder. Often, stones form when the urine is concentrated, allowing the minerals to crystallize and stick.

Passing kidney stones can be very painful, but the stones usually do not cause permanent damage if they are recognized in time. Depending on your situation, you may not need anything other than taking painkillers and drinking plenty of water to pass a kidney stone. In other cases, for example, if stones lodge in the urinary tract, are associated with urinary tract infection or cause complications, surgery may be required.

Your doctor may recommend preventive treatment to reduce the risk of recurrent kidney stones if you have a higher risk of developing them again.

SEE ALSO: How Kidney Functions

How kidney stones looks like

How are kidney stones diagnosed?

The diagnosis of kidney stones is some times suspected when the typical pattern of symptoms is observed and also when other possible causes of abdominal or flank pain are excluded. The ideal test for diagnosing kidney stones is controversial.

Imaging tests are usually carried out to confirm the diagnosis. Many patients presenting to the emergency will have a non-contrast scanner. This can be done quickly and will help eliminate other causes of abdominal or flank pain. However, a CT scan exposes patients to significant radiation and it has recently been shown that ultrasound combined with simple abdominal X-rays is effective in diagnosing kidney stones.

In pregnant women or those who should avoid exposure to radiation, an ultrasound can be performed to help establish the diagnosis.

What is the treatment for kidney stones?

Most kidney stones are removed through the urinary tract on their own within 48 hours, with abundant fluid intake. Ketorolac (Toradol), an injectable anti-inflammatory drug and narcotics, can be used to control pain when over-the-counter medications are not effective. Toradol, aspirin and NSAIDs should be avoided if lithotripsy is performed because of an increased risk of bleeding or if renal function is impaired. Intravenous pain medications may be given for nausea and vomiting.

Although there is no proven home remedy for dissolving kidney stones, home treatment may be considered for patients with a known history of kidney stones. Since most kidney stones, over time, go through the urethra and head to the bladder, the treatment is aimed at controlling the symptoms. Home care includes the consumption of abundant fluids. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) can be used as an analgesic if there is no contraindication to its use. If more pain medications are needed, more powerful narcotic pain medications may be recommended.

Several factors affect the ability to pass a stone. These include the size of the person, the previous step of the stone, enlargement of the prostate, pregnancy and the size of the stone. A 4mm stone has a 80% chance of passing, while a 5mm stone has a 20% chance. Stones over 9 mm to 10 mm rarely pass without specific treatment.

Some drugs have been used to increase the failure rate of kidney stones. Here are what the drugs contains, calcium channel blockers such as nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia, Afeditab, Nifediac) and alpha blockers such as tamsulosin (Flomax). These drugs may be prescribed to some people whose calculations do not pass quickly through the urinary tract.

For kidney stones that do not transmit alone, a procedure called lithotripsy is often used. In this procedure, shock waves are used to break a large stone into small pieces that can then pass through the urinary system.

Surgical techniques have also been developed to eliminate kidney stones when other methods of treatment are not effective.

This is mostly done by a small incision in the skin (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or by an instrument known as a ureteroscope that passes from the urethra to the bladder.

Facebook Comments
%d bloggers like this: